PLT #2

PLT Draft #1

Throughout the last two weeks of class we listened to three different Ted talk speakers, Carol Dweck, Atul Gawande, and Amy Cuddy. They all sharing their views  on different concerns they have; Carol Dweck on how you can improve based on your mindset, Atul Gawande on becoming better at something through coaching, and Amy Cuddy on body language shaping who are you. Although all three of these speakers have different thoughts they share to their audience, there is a link between them, and that’s how someone can better themself.

Throughout my first semester as a college student I have struggled with some of my harder classes; statistics for life sciences, chemistry, and biology. I found that my experiences connect best with Atul Gawande’s point of view on coaching. He is known as a great surgeon and always has good post- surgery outcomes. However, he decided to get a good to improve his technique, he found that his coach had a lot of notes on ways he could improve. I currently have a coach for english class, Eric Drown. He helps me improve my writing technique by asking if there’s a better way to do something and help form a clear, accurate thought to add to my writing assignment.

Atul states “Turns out there are numerous problems in making it on your own. You don’t recognize the issues that are standing in your way or i tou do, you do not necessarily known how to fix them. And the result is that somewhere along the way, you stop improving. And I thought about that, and i realized that was exactly what happened to me as a surgeon.” This quote reflects some of my work and grades in college and high school. Before college I wouldn’t have to try as hard to get good grades, I would study a little for a test and still earn a good mark. However, college classes came as a shock to me, I would have to try twice as hard and even when I did sometimes it didn’t work out, that’s when I go to SASC for help. This is like like Atul’s experience as a surgeon, he started to figure out ways to make his surgery easier and maybe slack off but still do it well enough to have a good outcome.

He also says “I remember that first case. It went beautifully. I didn’t think there would be anything much he’d have to say when we were done. Instead, he had a whole page dense with notes.” This statement reflects how I am when in coaching with Eric Drown. I will think that nothing needs to be fixed with a certain assignment but there will always be a better way to do something and learning from him has helped me improve and think in new ways about my writing. Atul’s point is to have someone else observe at what you’re doing or have done because someone will always catch onto something you didn’t’ and realizing that will help you improve for next time.


PLT Draft #2

Throughout the last two weeks of class we listened to three different TED talk speakers, Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at stanford university, Atul Gawande, a surgeon and writer, and Amy Cuddy, a social psychologist and speaker. During their talk they all shared their views on different concerns they have about the human body and brain function. Carol Dweck spoke of how someone can improve their learning based on their mindset, Atul gawande on becoming better at something through coaching, and Amy Cuddy discusses body language and faking it until you make it. All three of these speakers have different thoughts about human behavior, but they all link together on how people can better themselves based on learning to change if they have a growth mindset.

My first semester as a college student have been a rough start. I have struggled many times with my more advanced classes such as chemistry and biology. I found my experiences so far this semester connect best to Gawande’s speech on coaching. He is known as a great surgeon with good post-surgery outcomes, but decided to get a coach to improve his technique. He found that his coach had critiqued much of his work even though he thought it went perfectly. I currently have an english coach this semester, Eric Drown. So far he has helped me improve my writing technique and helps me understand my thoughts more clearly so I can better understand what i want to write.

Coaching with Eric made me realize I could get by in high school without trying very hard, but college is  a different story. Gawande states, “Turns out there are numerous problems in making it on your own.You don’t recognize the issues that are standing in your way or if you do, you do not necessarily know how to fix them. And the result is that somewhere along the way, you stop improving. And I thought about that, and I realized that was exactly what was happening to me as a surgeon.”

Unlike high school, i have access to a tutoring center at the university. When i become confused on an assignment or a certain concept in a class I make my way over to receive help. This quote also reflects my life as a gymnast. My coach, Gary would always push me to my limit and because of that I became one of the best on my team.

Gawande’s speech was to make his audience realize that even if you’re good at something and there’s always room for improvement. And although one may think their work is perfect someone will always catch onto issues that aren’t seen by the person and doing this will help them learn for next time.


PLT Draft #3

My Personal Connection on Gawande’s Coaching Speech

Throughout the last two weeks of class we listened to three different TED talk speakers, Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University, Atul Gawande, a surgeon and writer, and Amy Cuddy, a social psychologist and public speaker. During their talks they all shared their views on different concerns they have about the human body and brain function. Carol Dweck spoke of how someone can improve their learning based on their mindset, Atul Gawande on becoming better at something through coaching, and Amy Cuddy discusses body language and faking it until you make it. All three of these speakers have different thoughts about human behavior, but they all link together on how people can better themselves based on learning and having a growth mindset.

My first semester as a college student came off to a rough start. I have struggled many times with my more advanced classes such as chemistry and biology. I found my experiences so far this semester connect best to Gawande’s speech on coaching. He is known as a great surgeon with good post-surgery outcomes, but decided to get a coach to improve his technique. He found that his coach had critiqued much of his work even though he thought it went perfectly. I currently have an english coach this semester, Eric Drown. So far he has helped me improve my writing technique and helps me understand my thoughts more clearly so I can better understand what I want to write.

Coaching with Eric made me realize I could get by in high school without trying very hard, but college is  a different story. I’ll bring a completed or partially completed assignment with me to the session thinking it’s fine and not much needs to be changed; many things needed to change.  Gawande states, “Turns out there are numerous problems in making it on your own. You don’t recognize the issues that are standing in your way or if you do, you do not necessarily know how to fix them. And the result is that somewhere along the way, you stop improving. And I thought about that, and I realized that was exactly what was happening to me as a surgeon.” When I write a paper or work on a project, there are many times I don’t notice mistakes that someone else will, having someone to critique your work and notice things will help improve my work for next time. This is exactly what Gawande wants people to do, go out and get help.  

Unlike high school, I have access to a tutoring center at the University. When I become confused on an assignment or a certain concept in a class I make my way over to  SASC to receive help. This quote also reflects my life as a gymnast. My coach, Gary, would always push me to my limit, encourage me to try harder skills or sometimes even fix skills that need tweaking. It was always a non stop process of trying new things or improving old ones and because of that I became one of the best on my team. He noticed problems with my skills that I wouldn’t think of unless he was there, whether that be what my landing looked like, the amount of steps I’m taking before reaching the vault or sometimes at tiny, but important, as pointing my toes.

Within these different experiences I have gained many skills that I would not have been able to achieve on my own if it wasn’t for the help of my coaches academically and athletically. Learning from coaches in these two ways has helped me improve my skills in these two areas, I know what to look out for in certain situations and can correct myself when I’m on my own.

Gawande’s speech was meant to make his audience realize that even if you’re good at something,  there’s always room for improvement. And although one may think their work is perfect someone will always catch onto issues that aren’t seen by the person and doing this will help them learn for next time.


PLT Draft #4

Throughout the last two weeks of class we listened to three different TED talk speakers, Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University, Atul Gawande, a surgeon and writer and Amy Cuddy, a social psychologist and public speaker. During their talks they all shared their views on different concerns they have about the human body and brain function. Carol Dweck spoke of how someone can improve their learning based on their mindset, Atul Gawande on becoming better at something through coaching, and Amy Cuddy discusses body language and faking it until you make it. All three of these speakers have different thoughts about human behavior, but they all link together on how people can better themselves based on learning and having a growth mindset.

In my younger years as a gymnast my coach would always push me to my limit, encourage me to try harder skills and mainly fix skills that need tweaking. It was always a non stop process of trying new things or improving old ones and because of that I became one of the best on my team. He noticed problems with my skills that I wouldn’t think of unless he was there, whether that be what my landing looked like, the amount of steps I’m taking before reaching the vault or sometimes at tiny, but important, as pointing my toes. Coaching in athletics also helped improve my learning and motivation in school.

My first semester as a college student came off to a rough start, however unlike high school, I have access to a tutoring center at the University. When I become confused on an assignment or a certain concept in some of my more advanced classes such as biology and chemistry, I make my way over to  SASC to receive help. I found my experiences so far this semester connect best to Gawande’s speech on coaching. He is known as a great surgeon with good post-surgery outcomes, but decided to get a coach to improve his technique. He found that his coach had critiqued much of his work even though he thought it went perfectly. There is an obvious connection between my experiences and Gawande’s, but there are also many differences, one being, I’m not a surgeon handling someone’s life in my hands, but we do still need a coach to help us get better at what we do.

I currently have an english coach this semester, Eric Drown. Unlike Gawande, I didn’t pick him to be my coach, he was assigned to me.  So far this semester Eric has helped me improve my writing technique and helps me understand my thoughts more clearly so I can better understand what I want to write. Coaching with Eric made me realize I could get by in high school without trying very hard, but college is  a different story; the classes are more challenging, more people are in my class than I’m used to and most obvious, more is expected of me. When I go to coaching with Eric I’ll bring a completed or partially completed assignment with me to the session thinking it’s fine and not much needs to be changed; many things needed to change.  

Gawande emphasizes that we don’t know everything about our performance, instead he says, “Turns out there are numerous problems in making it on your own.You don’t recognize the issues that are standing in your way or if you do, you do not necessarily know how to fix them. And the result is that somewhere along the way, you stop improving. And I thought about that, and I realized that was exactly what was happening to me as a surgeon.” When I write a paper or work on a project, there are many times I don’t notice mistakes that someone else will, having someone to critique your work and notice things will help improve my work for next time. This is exactly what Gawande wants people to do, go out and get help.  

Within these different experiences I have gained many skills that I would not have been able to achieve on my own if it wasn’t for the help of my coaches academically and athletically. Learning from coaches in these two ways has helped me improve my skills in these two areas, I know what to look out for in certain situations and can correct myself when I’m on my own. Gawande’s speech was meant to make his audience realize that even if you’re good at something,  there’s always room for improvement. Although one may think their work is perfect someone will always catch onto issues that aren’t seen by the person and doing this will help someone achieve a growth mindset to do better in the future.