Essay 3 Prewriting-3

Bullet 1:

The neighborhoods of Los Angeles and Manhattan’s in the lives of Coates and Rose’s experience closely compare. Both of their childhoods revolved around avoiding violence on the street. Gang violence, prostitution, and murder. They had to memorize what routes to take and which streets to avoid to stay safe. Once they each had kids, their goal was to make their kids life better than theirs was. Rose’s moved his family to Los Angeles, California in high hopes that his son will have a better life and can make something for himself. Instead their life encountered bankruptcy and poverty. Each family lived in poor housing on dangerous sides of the city with many different ethnic groups, in coates’s situation there were many african americans and in Rose’s city the population consisted of Italian citizens, however there were many other ethnic groups that surrounded each city. One big connection between the two articles is the idea of the american dream. Each article has a thought about how they imagine their life should be. Coates uses the comparison of memorial day cookout and strawberry shortcake and Rose’s uses cinderella as a comparison. He thinks that his life will be like Cinderella’s night at the ball when it’s the opposite of what his life actually is.

Bullet 3:

I interpreted the quote, “developed a picture of human existence that rendered it short and brutish or sad and aimless or long and quiet…. When, years later, I was introduced to humanistic psychologists…, with their visions of self actualization…., it all sounded like a glorious fairy tale, a magical account of a world full of possibility, full of hope and empowerment. Sinbad and Cinderella couldn’t have been more fanciful” (p. 18)  as a way that Rose’s wants his life to be. His life has been revolving around violence and drugs because of the amount of money he had and where he lives. When he moved his family to Los Angeles he expected his life to be like cinderalla at the ball when really it was her life before cleaning floors, poor, and trying i live off the little rations he had. This quote explains that because it shows that h4 pected one thing but he got the other. He uses the word fanciful to show the dream that he was having thinking his life could or would be more than what he has.

Essay 3 Prewriting-2

Coates and his son may experience both the same and different experiences. When coates was a boy, laws in the united states were different and society had different morals. “You have some of the same acquaintance with the old rules, but they are not as essential to you as they were to me,” (Coates, pg. 24). This quotes is explaining that Coates would have to look out for different things than his son does. When coates was a kid he main concern was always being aware of his surroundings because of the violence that he encountered everyday, but his son may only experience very little violence on a day to day basis. Gang language is something his son may have to learn like his father did. To survive in the streets, you must understand a certain language and how to communicate. I think the major experience they will both share are the riots, gangs and bullies that surround Baltimore and what will be different is how they deal with these experience. The way Coates has been writing this article shows how he wants to give his child a better lifestyle than he had. He wants his child to experience the American Dream, and that’s why he’s so descriptive of it. Now that laws are different and the world is more accepting of other races, it has become a safer place.

Essay 3 Prewriting-1

Question 1: Coates describes the American Dream as “The most gorgeous dream” (pg.11). He uses a memorial day cookout and the smell of peppermint to exhibit his thoughts on the dream. He says “The dream smells like peppermint but takes like strawberry shortcake (pg.11). I think he is saying the American Dream sounds good but when you get it, it may be different. Using the example of a strawberry shortcake sounds good, but it’s not delicious to everybody.

Question 2: In the beginning of the article, violence is the main topic. Quotes say this country was built on violence and the people who endured it.  The fear was there in the extravagant boys of my neighborhood, in their large rings and medallion, their big puffy coats and full-length fur-coated leathers, which was their armor against their world.” (pg.14) This quote shows the fear black people have in the world now because of past hatred towards them. Abraham Lincoln’s speech before the battle of gettysburg was set towards the people whom he thoughts was important. The quote “the dream rests on our backs, the bedding made from our bodies” (pg 11) directly answers the question.

 

Covering Paper Final

cWhat is Covering?

People hide their identity for all different reasons, when this happens it’s called covering. Yoshino defines covering as “To tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream,” (479). He also uses the terms True Self and False Self throughout the article in order to exhibit his ideas on covering and when it occurs. After reading his article, what came to my attention most are the two terms listed above, equality paradigm and liberty paradigm. These four terms are essential for answering the questions; In what kinds of circumstances would a person need to hide a part of their identity? What might hiding a part of their identity do to and for a person – both in those particular circumstances and over time? And what might a society gain and lose when a person covers a part of their identity over time?

A false self is when someone pretends to be something they’re not, which can happen for many reasons; popularity, legal issues or protection. In some circumstances they  may hide only parts of their identity but other times they might hide who they are entirely. True self is when someone acts how they normally do and doesn’t pretend to be something they’re not, they may be in an environment where they feel completely comfortable to express who they are. However, in circumstances such as the Holocaust, Jewish people wanted to hide their identity to stay alive. A person also might try to hide their identity at a job interview or an event of significance to prevent them from getting in trouble or judged unfairly. Overtime if a person hides their identity they may lose track of who they are, whether it’s good or bad, or it can shape them into the person they’re hoping to be. Society is exceptional at making people hide their identity in order to fit the standards.

When someone who has a “different” personality hides their true self, society gains a dominant group of people looking and acting a certain way, everything is orderly and predictable. However when this happens it causes unique people to be lost and silenced, when the person could have benefitted a certain cause, we have a loss of potential. “In practice, I expect the liberty paradigm to protect the authentic self better than the equality paradigm. While it need not do so, the equality paradigm is prone to essentializing the identities it protects. Under an equality paradigm, if a woman who wore a lot of makeup were protected by a court because makeup is an “essential” part of being a woman, this could reinforce the stereotype that women wear makeup,” (485). In the article, Liberty Paradigm is defined as “to protect the authentic self” and Equality Paradigm is defined at “Essentializing the identities it protects,” (485). What this quote is saying is the liberty paradigm protects what people do to express themselves and that the equality paradigm protects how people chose to identify themselves, which is why the use of makeup is an example to explain this. Women are categorized into certain groups as are many other people who do things that may not be normal to certain people, however they’re not protected by law.

The Civil Rights law protects a citizen’s race, sex, orientation, religion and disabilities, which is one of  Yoshino’s significant points throughout the article. If there is a law to protect these rights, then what about the groups that aren’t as accepted? “Law is also an incomplete solution to coerced assimilation because it has yet to recognize my raid groups subjected to covering demands outside traditional civil rights classifications like race, sex, orientation, religion, and disability. Whenever I speak about covering, I receive new instances of identities that can be covered. This is Winnicott’s point- each one of us has a False Self that hides a True one. The law may someday move to protect some of these identities. But it will never protect them all,” (486). This quote explains that there are many different groups outside of the typical norms, however a law can’t protect them all from harassment and judgement. These minority groups may feel they need to cover this identity to avoid certain situations from happening.

In society today it’s a shame people have to hide who they are because they are fearful of how others will act. Authority gets involved substantially with issues like these and most people depend on these people to defend their rights, which is explained in the quote, “For these reasons, I am troubled that Americans seem increasingly to turn toward the law to do the work of civil rights precisely when they should be turning away from it. The real solution lies in all of us as citizens, not in the tiny subset of us who are lawyers. People who are not lawyers should have reason-forcing conversations outside the law,” (487).

Covering is beneficial to learn about because we can understand our own actions and if we do in fact have a false self, or if we are trying to hide ourselves. We can discover who we are in certain settings and around certain people. Once we know these things about ourselves we can decide who we want in our lives so we can act as our true self all the time. It also brings attention to what civil rights laws have done for certain people of different classifications. Civil rights laws help minority groups feel protected from hate crimes and the overall image of what their identity stands for. These laws have also helped people feel proud of who they are. We encounter different identities every day we are on earth so it’s in our favor to learn about these things to gain a better understanding of the people around us.

 

Work Cited

Yoshino, Kenji. “Preface” and “The New Civil Rights.” Emerging: Contemporary Readings For Writers, edited by Barclay Barrios, Bedford/St. Martins, 2010, pp. 479-488.

 

Covering Paper 3

People hide their identity for all different reasons, when this happens it’s called covering. Yoshino defines covering as “To tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream,” (479). He also uses the terms true self and false self throughout the article in order to exhibit his ideas on covering and when it occurs. After reading his article, what came to my attention most are the two terms listed above, equality paradigm and liberty paradigm. These four words are essential for answering the questions; In what kinds of circumstances would a person need to hide a part of their identity? What might hiding a part of their identity do to and for a person – both in those particular circumstances and over time? And what might a society gain and lose when a person covers a part of their identity over time?

A false self is when someone pretends to be something they’re not, which can happen for many reasons; popularity, legal issues or protection. In some circumstances they  may hide only parts of their identity but other times they might hide who they are entirely and a true self is when someone acts how they normally do and doesn’t pretend to be something they’re not, they may be in an environment where they feel completely comfortable to express who they are. However, in circumstances such as the Holocaust, Jewish people wanted to hide their identity to stay alive. A person also might try to hide their identity at a job interview or an event of significance to prevent them from getting in trouble or judged unfairly. Overtime if a person hides their identity they may lose track of who they are, whether it’s good or bad, or it can shape them into the person they’re hoping to be. Society is exceptional at making people hide their identity in order to fit the standards.

When someone who has a “different” personality hides their true self, society gains a dominant group of people looking and acting a certain way, everything is orderly and predictable. However when this happens it causes unique people to be lost and silenced, when the person could have benefitted a certain cause, we have a loss of potential.“In practice, I expect the liberty paradigm to protect the authentic self better than the equality paradigm. While it need not do so, the equality paradigm is prone to essentializing the identities it protects. Under an equality paradigm, if a woman who wore a lot of makeup were protected by a court because makeup is an “essential” part of being a woman, this could reinforce the stereotype that women wear makeup,” (485). What this quote is saying is the liberty paradigm protects what people do to express themselves and that the equality paradigm protects how people chose to identify themselves, which is why the use of makeup is an example to explain this. Groups of women are categorized into certain groups as are many other people who do all the same things that may not be normal to certain people, however they’re not protected by law.

The civil rights law  protects groups such as race, sex, orientation, religion and disabilities, which is one of  Yoshino’s significant points throughout the article. If there is a law to protect these rights, then what about the groups that aren’t as popular? “Law is also an incomplete solution to coerced assimilation because it has yet to recognize my raid groups subjected to covering demands outside traditional civil rights classifications like race, sex, orientation, religion, and disability. Whenever I speak about covering, I receive new instances of identities that can be covered. This is Winnicott’s point- each one of us has a False Self that hides a True one. The law may someday move to protect some of these identities. But it will never protect them all,” (486). This quote explains that there are many different groups outside of the typical ones, however a law can’t protect them all from harassment and judgement. These minority groups may feel they need to cover this identity to avoid certain situations from happening.

In society today it’s a shame people have to hide who they are because they are fearful of how others will act. Law enforcement gets involved substantially with issues like these and most people depend on these people to defend their rights, which is explained in the quote, “For these reasons, I am troubled that Americans seem increasingly to turn toward the law to do the work of civil rights precisely when they should be turning away from it. The real solution lies in all of us as citizens, not in the tiny subset of us who are lawyers. People who are not lawyers should have reason-forcing conversations outside the law,” (487).

Covering is beneficial to learn about because we can understand our own actions and if we do in fact have a false self, or if we are trying to hide ourselves. We can discover who we are in certain settings and around certain people. Once we know these things about yourself we can decide who we want in our lives so we can act as our true self all the time. It also brings attention to what civil rights laws have done for certain people of different classifications. Civil rights laws help minority groups feel protected from hate crimes and the overall image of what their identity stands for. These laws have also helped people feel proud of who they are. We encounter different identities every day we are on earth so it’s in our favor to learn about these things to gain a better understanding of the people around us.

Covering Paper 2

Covering happens when people of a certain group feel they need to hide who they are in order to refrain from harm or judgement. As Yoshino puts it, it means “To tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream,” (479). He uses the terms true self and false self throughout his book in order to exhibit his ideas on covering and when it occurs. From reading his article what comes to my attention most are the two terms listed above, equality paradigm and liberty paradigm. These four words are essential for answering the questions, In what kinds of circumstances would a person need to hide a part of their identity? What might hiding a part of their identity do to and for a person – both in those particular circumstances and over time? And what might a society gain and lose when a person covers a part of their identity over time?

The civil rights law protects the groups like race, sex, orientation, religion and disabilities, which is one of  Yoshino’s significant points throughout his book. “Law is also an incomplete solution to coerced assimilation because it has yet to recognize myraid groups subjected to covering demands outside traditional civil rights classifications like race, sex, orientation, religion, and disability. Whenever I speak about covering, I receive new instances of identities that can be covered. This is Winnicott’s point- each one of us has a False Self that hides a True one. The law may someday move to protect some of these identities. But it will never protect them all,” (486). Ultimately, there are many different groups outside of the major ones, however we are not subjected to protecting them because the threat isn’t big enough. Yoshino wants every group to feel safe without needed the law to get involved. Yoshino’s  point regarding the law also connects to another one of his quotes, “For these reasons, I am troubled that Americans seem increasingly to turn toward the law to do the work of civil rights precisely when they should be turning away from it. The real solution lies in all of us as citizens, not in the tiny subset of us who are lawyers. People who are not lawyers should have reason-forcing conversations outside the law,” (487).

A false self is when someone pretends to be something they’re not, which can happen for many reasons; popularity, legal, etc. A true self is when someone acts how they normally do and doesn’t pretend to be something they’re not. In circumstances such as the Holocaust, Jewish people wanted to hide their identity to stay alive. A person might try to hide their identity at a job interview or an event of significance to prevent them from getting in trouble. Overtime if a person hides their identity they may lose track of who they are, whether it’s good or bad, or it can shape them into the person they’re hoping to be. Society is exceptional at making people hide their identity in order to fit the standards. However when this happens it causes unique people to be lost and silenced, when the person could have benefitted a certain cause, we have a loss of potential.

What is gained from society is a dominant group of people looking and acting a certain way, everything is orderly and predictable. “In practice, I expect the liberty paradigm to protect the authentic self better than the equality paradigm. While it need not do so, the equality paradigm is prone to essentializing the identities it protects. Under an equality paradigm, if a woman who wore a lot of makeup were protected by a court because makeup is an “essential” part of being a woman, this could reinforce the stereotype that women wear makeup,” (485). What this quote is saying is the liberty paradigm protects what people do to express themselves and that the equality paradigm protects how people chose to identify themselves, which is why the use of makeup is an example to explain this.

Covering is beneficial to learn about because we can understand our own actions and if we do in fact have a false self, or if we are trying to hide ourselves. It also brings attention to what civil rights laws have done for certain people of different classifications so they feel safe. In order for people to have a true self all the time they need to feel comfortable expressing who they are without discrimination. It also helped me understand the difference between liberty paradigm and equality paradigm, learning the difference helps gain a deeper understanding on the topic of covering.

Covering Paper 1

Covering happens when people of a certain group feel they need to hide who they are in order to refrain from harm or judgement. As Yoshino puts it, it means “To tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream,” (479). He uses the terms true self and false self throughout his book in order to exhibit his ideas on covering and when it occurs. From reading his article what comes to my attention most are the two terms listed above, equality paradigm and liberty paradigm. These four words are essential for answering the questions, In what kinds of circumstances would a person need to hide a part of their identity? What might hiding a part of their identity do to and for a person – both in those particular circumstances and over time? And what might a society gain and lose when a person covers a part of their identity over time?
The civil rights law protects the groups like race, sex, orientation, religion and disabilities, which is one of Yoshino’s significant points throughout his book. “Law is also an incomplete solution to coerced assimilation because it has yet to recognize myraid groups subjected to covering demands outside traditional civil rights classifications like race, sex, orientation, religion, and disability. Whenever I speak about covering, I receive new instances of identities that can be covered. This is Winnicott’s point- each one of us has a False Self that hides a True one. The law may someday move to protect some of these identities. But it will never protect them all,” (486).
Yoshino’s point regarding the law also connects to another one of his quotes, “For these reasons, I am troubled that Americans seem increasingly to turn toward the law to do the work of civil rights precisely when they should be turning away from it. The real solution lies in all of us as citizens, not in the tiny subset of us who are lawyers. People who are not lawyers should have reason-forcing conversations outside the law,” (487).
A false self is when someone pretends to be something they’re not, which can happen for many reasons; popularity, legal, etc. A true self is when someone acts how they normally do and doesn’t pretend to be something they’re not. In circumstances such as the Holocaust, Jewish people wanted to hide their identity to stay alive. A person might try to hide their identity at a job interview or an event of significance to prevent them from getting in trouble. Overtime if a person hides their identity they may lose track of who they are, whether it’s good or bad, or it can shape them into the person they’re hoping to be.
Society is exceptional at making people hide their identity in order to fit the standards. However when this happens it causes unique people to be lost and silenced, when the person could have benefitted a certain cause, we have a loss of potential. What is gained from society is a dominant group of people looking and acting a certain way, everything is orderly and predictable. “In practice, I expect the liberty paradigm to protect the authentic self better than tthe equality paradigm. While it need not do so, the equality paradigm is prone to essentializing the identities it protects. Under an equality paradigm, if a woman who wore a lot of makeup were protected by a court because makeup is an “essential” part of being a woman, this could reinforce the stereotype that women wear makeup,” (485).
Covering is beneficial to learn about because we can understand our own actions and if we do in fact have a false self, or if we are trying to hide ourselves. It also brings attention to what civil rights laws have done for certain people of different classifications so they feel safe. In order for people to have a true self all the time they need to feel comfortable expressing who they are without discrimination.

Essay 2 Prewriting Activity-2

The paradigm rights of civil rights and equality is about how homosexuals are treated poorly and their civil rights were almost non existent. This lawyer wring out the identity of being a homosexual during this time period and what they were treated like and how they acted to keep themselves safe from harm. He believes that being true to the ones that love you will keep you safe and it’s okay to be a false self to the ones that don’t because at the end of the day all that matters is that the one’s that love you are accepting of you. In the 21st century, Muslims must hide their true self because there is a lot of bias based on them and a correlation between terrorism, they must hide their true selves to remain safe from harm of judgement or harassment.

Civil rights must be protected because it gives people their basic human rights to feel free to express themselves in any way, it must be protected also because may people would protest against it if it wasn’t. These rights can remain protected as long as people bring awareness to the situation and it is still a modern topic to talk about.

Essay 2 Prewriting Activity-1

In Yoshino’s article he speaks of the term covering. His definition of the term is “to tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream.” What he is saying is that people chose to hide their identity based on bias or the fear of being hated by others. The media is also filled with hate based on certain identities.  A true self is when someone feels they are being themself around other people and a false self is the opposite, they can’t be themselves around other people so they feel as if they are being fake. “The true self was hidden behind an ostensibly straight false self,”  (Yoshino 483).